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Cyber crime: How companies are hit by email scams by Online Security

 

Fraudsters are using clever impersonation techniques to siphon millions from unprotected businesses

 

When Keith McMurtry, corporate controller of Scoular, a 124-year-old US grain-trading and storage company, was asked by his chief executive to wire $17.2m to an offshore bank account, he did not question it.

 

Chuck Elsea told Mr McMurtry in a top-secret email that Scoular was in talks to acquire a Chinese company. The chief executive instructed him to liaise with a lawyer at KPMG who would provide the wiring instructions to an account in China.

 

“We need the company to be funded properly and to show sufficient strength toward the Chinese. Keith, I will not forget your professionalism in this deal, and I will show you my appreciation very shortly,” Mr Elsea wrote in an email in June 2014. Over three transactions, Mr McMurtry transferred the $17.2m to an account in the name of Dadi Co at Shanghai Pudong Development Bank, according to an affidavit signed by an agent with the Federal Bureau of Investigation and filed in a Nebraska court.

 

The email was a fraud. Criminals impersonated Mr Elsea by creating a phoney email account in his name. They also set up fake email and phone numbers in the name of a real KPMG partner, who later said he had never heard of Scoular. US authorities have traced the emails and phone number to Germany, France, Israel and Russia.

 

Scoular, which is ranked 66th on Forbes’ list of the US’s largest private companies with revenues of $5.9bn, is one of several thousand companies that have fallen victim to a new type of fraud known as business email compromise schemes which have netted $800m in the past six months.

 

In January 2015, Xoom, an international money transfer company bought for $890m last July by PayPal, a pioneer in digital payments, said an employee in its finance department was duped into transferring $30.8m in corporate cash to an overseas account.

 

Ubiquiti Networks, a US manufacturer of wireless networking products, disclosed that its finance department was targeted last June by an imposter and transferred $46.7m to overseas accounts. After discovering the fraud the company began legal proceedings and has recovered $8.1m.

 

In the boss’s name

 

More than 12,000 businesses worldwide have been targeted by the scams, also known as CEO email schemes, between October 2013 and this month. The transactions have netted criminals $2bn, according to the Internet Crime Complaint Center, an intelligence and investigative group within the FBI that tracks computer crimes. Companies large and small, across 108 countries, have been hit and the threat is growing, law enforcement officials say.

 

“It has gotten quite out of hand,” says Mitchell Thompson, a supervisory special agent and head of the financial cyber crimes task force in the FBI’s New York office.

 

The criminals are “becoming more brash”, he says, by introducing third parties, such as law firms and consultants, to carry out the fraud. They have also become more sophisticated about how they troll potential victims.

 

“They’re using social media a lot against us. They might send a spam email intentionally to see that the executive is out of the office, [making] it prime time to target. They might look on Facebook and see that [the chief executive is] travelling to Europe or Australia so they know you’re in the air for a certain amount of time” and have a window to strike, Mr Thompson says.

 

Tricking people using the internet to steal money is hardly new. There have been criminal groups taking advantage of users of dating websites and fundraisers for disasters or terrorist attacks. A decade ago authorities were flooded with complaints of bogus Nigerian email scams and false lottery winners.

 

Criminals use a variety of tactics. Sometimes they gain access to executives’ emails by hacking into the accounts using phishing emails. The accounts of chief executives can also be spoofed by changing a letter or replacing a company’s official email service with a Gmail account. The phoney account created to mimic the KPMG lawyer used the suffix @kpmg-office.com, a fake address convincing enough to trick someone who is not checking carefully.

 

The criminals usually impersonate the executive and order the transfer, often through a second account they secretly control, such as the one said to belong to the KPMG lawyer. The money is sent to accounts in Asia or Africa, where it is harder for authorities to recover. By the time the company realises it has been duped, authorities say, the money has long gone.

 

Mr McMurtry told the FBI that he was not suspicious of the transfers since Scoular was discussing an expansion in China and he had been working on an annual audit with KPMG, according to the FBI affidavit. Mr McMurtry, who is no longer with Scoular, did not respond to requests for comment. Scoular also declined to speak.

 

Inauspicious origins

 

The scam began simply enough. Mr McMurtry received an email purporting to be from Mr Elsea. “I have assigned you to manage file FT-809,” the bogus email said. “This is a strictly confidential operation, which takes priority over other tasks. Have you already been contacted by Rodney Lawrence [the KPMG lawyer]?” It went on: “This is very sensitive, so please only communicate with me through this email, in order for us not to infringe SEC regulations.”

 

The following day “Mr Elsea” sent another email stating that the transfer was urgent and he should “proceed asap with the wire to the same beneficiary and bank account as yesterday”.

 

FBI agents traced the phoney email account in Mr Elsea’s name to Germany. The KPMG email name was linked to a server in Moscow. The phone number provided was traced to a Skype account registered in Israel.

 

Scoular’s lawyers told the FBI that Wells Fargo said Dadi — the name on the account in Shanghai where Mr McMurtry sent the money — manufactured army boots. Dadi claimed to the bank that the wire transfers were part of a sales contract for the manufacture of boots, according to the FBI affidavit. Scoular said it did not purchase boots.

 

Mr Lawrence, the KPMG lawyer whose identity was used in the email scheme, is the global leader of KPMG’s international tax services. When interviewed by the FBI he told them he was not familiar with Scoular and had not spoken with anyone at the company, according to the affidavit.

 

The FBI obtained a court order to seize the funds held at Shanghai Pudong Development Bank but was told that the account had been closed and the funds transferred.

 

Business email compromise crimes are “a huge” problem, says Austin Berglas, head of cyber investigations at K2 Intelligence and a former chief of the FBI’s cyber branch in New York. Executives are so reliant on email they do not pick up the phone to confirm the transaction and “there is no second check,” he adds.

 

Some of the email scams are similar, suggesting they come from the same criminal organisation.

 

The FBI and US Justice Department have several investigations under way. Over the past 12 months the FBI has put more intelligence analysts on the case and have liaised with law enforcement agencies worldwide. “We will open cases this year and we will make arrests this year,” says James Barnacle, chief of the FBI’s money laundering unit.

 

‘Strictly confidential’

 

Glen Wurm, director of accounting at AFGlobal Corp, which makes products for the aerospace, oil and gas industries, received an email in May 2014 similar to that sent to Scoular.

 

Purportedly from Gean Stalcup, the company’s chief executive, it said: “Glen, I have assigned you to manage file T521. This is a strictly confidential financial operation which takes priority over other tasks. Have you already been contacted by Steven Shapiro [attorney KPMG]?”

 

Mr Wurm was told not to speak to anyone and was directed to wire $480,000 to an account at the “Agriculture Bank of China”, according to legal documents. The hacker mimicked the tone Mr Stalcup used with Mr Wurm, according to a lawsuit that AFGlobal filed against its insurer Federal Insurance.

 

Six days later, Mr Shapiro contacted Mr Wurm confirming he had received the transfer, adding that he needed another $18m, according to a lawsuit. At this point Mr Wurm became suspicious and said he could not send so much money without alerting senior executives.

 

It was too late: the bank account had been emptied. AFGlobal is suing Federal Insurance and Chubb, its parent company, seeking more than $1m for allegedly breaching its contract by not covering the claim. Chubb has declined to comment.

 

Mr Thompson has declined to discuss either scheme but says criminal groups copy successful tactics. While some schemes have been as large as $90m, the average loss is $120,000.

 

“The ones you don’t hear about are the smaller corporations that send $50,000. They’re saying, ‘I’m not going to make payroll, we’re going to close our doors’ as a result of the fraud,” Mr Thompson says.

 

There is little that companies can do to recover the funds. Banks are not required by law to reimburse a company that makes a transfer. Cyber insurance policies might not cover a fraud against a company if its network has not been hacked.

 

“The bank will look at the totality of what the company has done to protect itself and whether or not they’re adhering to the agreement that the company has signed associated with the initiation of any of these wires,” says Doug Johnson, senior vice-president of overseas payments and cyber security at the American Bankers Association. One good practice is requiring the approval of two people, he says.

 

That practice is not fail-safe, however.

 

Like AFGlobal, Medidata Solutions, a clinical technology company, fell victim to email fraud in September 2014.

 

An employee in accounts received an email from an executive requesting a money transfer, according to a lawsuit filed in a federal New York court against Federal Insurance. The email included an image of the executive’s face and his signature.

 

Like the other alleged scams, the email included the name of a lawyer, who would act as a liaison for the employee. The employee told the lawyer that he needed the approval of two others before a $4.7m transfer could be made.

 

The fraudsters had a solution, though. Later that day, two employees with authority to sign off on the transfer were emailed instructions, purporting to be from the chief executive of Medidata, telling them to approve the wire to a bank account in China.

 

The transfer went through. Two days later, an email from the lawyer told the same employees to initiate a second transfer of $4.8m. One of the employees had grown nervous and called the executive direct — stopping the fraud and saving millions for the company.

 

Yet law enforcement officials say companies need to be more vigilant to guard against a crime that has become simpler to commit. “It’s easy,” says Mr Barnacle. “All you need is a computer.”


Robert Revell nov 7 16, 10:03
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Anonymous Internet Vigilantes Are Taking Peer Review Into Their Own Hands by Online Security

Since 2012, the message board PubPeer has served as a sort of 4chan for science, allowing anyone to post anonymous comments on scientific studies. Originally intended as a forum for the discussion of methods and results, PubPeer has perhaps become best known as a clearinghouse for accusations of scientific error, fraud, and misconduct—forcing journals to issue corrections and retractions, damaging careers, and eventually embroiling the site in a court case in which it’s advised by Edward Snowden’s legal team at the American Civil Liberties Union.

 

In the view of its critics, PubPeer enables an unchecked stream of accusations with no accountability. But to its supporters, PubPeer is maybe the only consistently effective way to expose fraud and error in the current scientific system. It exists at a time of quiet crisis for science and science journals, when the community is concerned about an inability to replicate past results—the so-called “reproducibility crisis”—and the number of papers retracted is on the rise. The traditional system of peer review seems unable to address these problems.

 

“We started it because we wanted more detailed arguments about science, and we were really shocked at how many fundamental problems there are with papers, involving very questionable research practices and rather obvious misconduct,” said Brandon Stell, a neuroscientist at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in Paris and the creator of PubPeer.

 

There’s certainly no denying its effect. According to Retraction Watch, a blog that monitors scientific corrections, errors, and fraud, at least three high-profile scientists in the past few months have had their studies retracted by journals after their data was questioned by anonymous commenters on PubPeer.

 

The most frightening words a researcher could read on PubPeer are 'There are concerns'

 

One of the scientists, Fazlul Sarkar, is currently suing several of the commenters. His lawyers argue the site must reveal the identities of the users that have done damage to Sarkar’s career, after he lost a tenured position at the University of Mississippi. PubPeer has refused to release the information. Both Google and Twitter have filed a court brief in support of the site, which is currently being defended pro-bono by lawyers from the ACLU.

 

It’s perhaps the most interesting case about internet privacy you've never heard of, and it all stems from a frustration among scientists with the shadowy politics of publishing and peer review.

 

At its base, PubPeer is a site that allows anyone to post comments on any scientific paper listed on the federally-funded PubMed database, either anonymously or under their own name. It’s functionally very simple, but the built-in anonymity makes it a safe outlet for scientists—especially young, early-career scientists—to discuss and criticize research without fear of repercussion. And that’s something they’re apparently eager to do: The site has logged over 55,000 mostly anonymous comments since its launch.

 

Back in October 2013, someone on the PubPeer site started threads for about 20 previously published papers on which Fazlul Sarkar, a cancer researcher then at Wayne State University in Michigan, was an author. The papers span over a decade and involve a variety of complex molecular signalling pathways involved in cancer. The issues raised by the comments, though, were relatively straightforward: They claimed that images in these studies appeared to have been changed, duplicated, and re-used across papers, suggesting that the experiments they appeared in may have never actually happened, or could have produced different results.

 

Stell noted that, in an effort to keep the discussion civil (and legal), PubPeer specifically requests that users do not accuse authors outright of misrepresentation or fraud. Comments are moderated in case they break these guidelines, so any discussion of such allegations tends to have a muted tone.

 

That doesn’t make this group of self-appointed watchdogs any less effective, though. The most frightening words a researcher could read on PubPeer are “There are concerns.”

 

Discussion over “concerns” surrounding Sarkar’s work expanded rapidly as it became clear the commenters had found a rich vein to mine: According to the NIH funding database and PubMed, Sarkar has received more than $12 million in NIH funding and authored over 500 research papers over his career. The community is nothing if not meticulous—PubPeer commenters have been known to pull up decades-old PhD theses looking for dirt—and a search of the message board shows that eventually 77 papers with Sarkar on the author list were presented for scrutiny. By checking the papers against each other patterns began to emerge; for example, one user claims a single set of images were duplicated up to 54 times in 13 papers, across three years.


Robert Revell oct 26 16, 06:01
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Oakmere Road: “Someone Has Reported Your Actions” Facebook Phishing Scam

Outline:

Message purporting to be from Facebook Security Management claims that your account will be disabled because other users have reported your actions. It instructs you to click a link to re-confirm your details or Facebook will remove your account.

 

Brief Analysis:

The message is not an official Facebook security warning. Instead, it is a phishing scam designed to steal your Facebook login details as well as your credit card numbers, your email account password, and other identifying information. It is just one in a long line of very similar scam messages. If you receive one of these messages, do not click on any links that it contains.

 

Example:

WARNING: Your account will be disabled!

Our system has received the reports from the other users about the misuse of your account. Someone has reported your actions, which violations of our terms.

Facebook does not allow:

• Pretending to be someone else

• Interfere with another comfort for the user

• Having more than one Facebook

• Share link or video content with pornographic videos

If you are really user of this account, you’ll need to re-confirm your account. It’s easy, Click the link below to confirm your account:

 

If you do not immediately confirm a grace period of 12 hours after you receive this message, so sorry we will remove of your account.

Thanks,

Miller

Security Management

Facebook

 

According to this warning message, which claims to be from “Miller” at “Security Management Facebook”, your Facebook account is set to be disabled. Supposedly, you have been misusing your account and someone has therefore reported your actions.

 

The message then claims that you must click a link to re-confirm your account within 12 hours or Facebook will remove the offending account. The warning is distributed via Facebook’s internal messaging system.

 

However, the message is certainly not from any official security manager at Facebook.  And the claim that your account will be disabled if you do not confirm your information is a lie.

 

If you are taken in by the ruse and click the link in the hope of saving your account, you will be taken to a fraudulent webpage that has been built to emulate the real Facebook website.  The fake webpage asks you to “login” with your Facebook email address and password. Next, a second form will appear that asks you to provide your webmail address and password as well as your date of birth, country, phone number, and account security question:

 

Finally, you will be redirected to the Facebook Newsroom website. At this point, you may believe that you have successfully confirmed your information and thereby avoided the threatened account removal.

 

In reality, however,  online criminals now have a good deal of your personal and financial information. They can use your information to hijack both your Facebook account and email account. Once they have gained entry to these accounts, they can use them to send out further scam and spam messages. They may send new versions of the above scam to your friends from your Facebook account via private messages.

 

The criminals can also use your credit card to conduct fraudulent transactions.  They may also manage to use all of the personal information they have collected to steal your identity.

 

This criminal tactic is not new.  In fact, this scam message is just one in a long line of very similar scams that have targeted Facebook users for several years. Be wary of any message that purports to be from Facebook and claims that your account will be disabled or suspended if you do not click a link to verify your account details. If Facebook needs you to address an account issue, you will most likely receive a notification from within Facebook itself when you login.

 

If one of these scam messages comes your way, do not click any links that it contains. Always login to Facebook by entering the address into your browser’s address bar or via a trusted app.

 


Robert Revell sep 24 16, 06:18
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Oakmere Road: 6 Common Phishing Attacks and How to Protect Against Them

At this year’s RSA Conference, Tripwire conducted a survey where it asked 200 security professionals to weigh in on the state of phishing attacks.

 

More than half (58 percent) of respondents stated their organizations had seen an increase in phishing attacks in the past year. Despite that increase, most companies didn’t feel prepared to protect themselves against phishing scams. Indeed, a slight majority (52 percent) stated they were “not confident” in their executives’ ability to successfully spot a phishing scam.

 

The growth of phishing attacks in both frequency and sophistication, as noted by Verizon in its 2016 Data Breach Investigations Report, poses a significant threat to all organizations. It’s important that all companies know how to spot some of the most common phishing scams if they are to protect their corporate information.

 

With that in mind, I will use a guide developed by CloudPages to discuss six common phishing attacks: deceptive phishing, spear phishing, CEO fraud, pharming, Dropbox phishing, and Google Docs phishing. I will then provide some useful tips on how organizations can protect themselves against these phishing scams.

 

1. DECEPTIVE PHISHING

 

The most common type of phishing scam, deceptive phishing refers to any attack by which fraudsters impersonate a legitimate company and attempt to steal people’s personal information or login credentials. Those emails frequently use threats and a sense of urgency to scare users into doing the attackers’ bidding.

 

For example, PayPal scammers might send out an attack email that instructs them to click on a link in order to rectify a discrepancy with their account. In actuality, the link leads to a fake PayPal login page that collects a user’s login credentials and delivers them to the attackers.

 

The success of a deceptive phish hinges on how closely the attack email resembles a legitimate company’s official correspondence. As a result, users should inspect all URLs carefully to see if they redirect to an unknown website. They should also look out for generic salutations, grammar mistakes, and spelling errors scattered throughout the email.

 

 

Not all phishing scams lack personalization – some use it quite heavily.

 

For instance, in spear phishing scams, fraudsters customize their attack emails with the target’s name, position, company, work phone number and other information in an attempt to trick the recipient into believing that they have a connection with the sender.

 

The goal is the same as deceptive phishing: lure the victim into clicking on a malicious URL or email attachment, so that they will hand over their personal data.

 

Spear-phishing is especially commonplace on social media sites like LinkedIn, where attackers can use multiple sources of information to craft a targeted attack email.

 

To protect against this type of scam, organizations should conduct ongoing employee security awareness training that, among other things, discourages users from publishing sensitive personal or corporate information on social media. Companies should also invest in solutions that are capable of analyzing inbound emails for known malicious links/email attachments.

 

3. CEO FRAUD

 

Spear phishers can target anyone in an organization, even top executives. That’s the logic behind a “whaling” attack, where fraudsters attempt to harpoon an executive and steal their login credentials.

 

In the event their attack proves successful, fraudsters can choose to conduct CEO fraud, the second phase of a business email compromise (BEC) scam where attackers impersonate an executive and abuse that individual’s email to authorize fraudulent wire transfers to a financial institution of their choice.

 

Whaling attacks work because executives often don’t participate in security awareness training with their employees. To counter that threat, as well as the risk of CEO fraud, all company personnel – including executives – should undergo ongoing security awareness training.

 

Organizations should also consider amending their financial policies, so that no one can authorize a financial transaction via email.

 

4. PHARMING

 

As users become more savvy to traditional phishing scams, some fraudsters are abandoning the idea of “baiting” their victims entirely. Instead, they are resorting to pharming – a method of attack which stems from domain name system (DNS) cache poisoning.

 

The Internet’s naming system uses DNS servers to convert alphabetical website names, such as “www.microsoft.com,” to numerical IP addresses used for locating computer services and devices.

 

Under a DNS cache poisoning attack, a pharmer targets a DNS server and changes the IP address associated with an alphabetical website name. That means an attacker can redirect users to a malicious website of their choice even if the victims entered in the correct website name.

 

To protect against pharming attacks, organizations should encourage employees to enter in login credentials only on HTTPS-protected sites. Companies should also implement anti-virus software on all corporate devices and implement virus database updates, along with security upgrades issued by a trusted Internet Service Provider (ISP), on a regular basis.

 

5. DROPBOX PHISHING

 

While some phishers no longer bait their victims, others have specialized their attack emails according to an individual company or service.

 

Take Dropbox, for example. Millions of people use Dropbox every day to back up, access and share their files. It’s no wonder, therefore, that attackers would try to capitalize on the platform’s popularity by targeting users with phishing emails.

 

One attack campaign, for example, tried to lure users into entering their login credentials on a fake Dropbox sign-in page hosted on Dropbox itself.

 

To protect against Dropbox phishing attacks, users should consider implementing two-step verification (2SV) on their accounts. For a step-by-step guide on how to activate this additional layer of security, please click here.

 

6. GOOGLE DOCS PHISHING

 

Fraudsters could choose to target Google Drive similar to the way they might prey upon Dropbox users.

 

Specifically, as Google Drive supports documents, spreadsheets, presentations, photos and even entire websites, phishers can abuse the service to create a web page that mimics the Google account log-in screen and harvests user credentials.

 

A group of attackers did just that back in July of 2015. To add insult to injury, not only did Google unknowingly host that fake login page, but a Google SSL certificate also protected the page with a secure connection.

 

Once again, users should consider implementing 2SV to protect themselves against this type of threat. They can enable the security feature via either SMS messaging or the Google Authenticator app.

 

CONCLUSION

 

Using the guide above, organizations will be able to more quickly spot some of the most common types of phishing attacks. But that doesn’t mean they will be able to spot each and every phish. On the contrary, phishing is constantly evolving to adopt new forms and techniques.

 

With that in mind, it’s imperative that organizations conduct security awareness training on an ongoing basis so that their employees and executives stay on top of emerging phishing attacks.


Robert Revell sep 15 16, 06:00
0 0

How first-year college students can avoid being victims of scammers by Oakmere Road

First-year college students go through a lot of growing pains as they face new challenges and opportunities. As they figure out which major to choose, learn how to juggle work and school and just live on their own for the first time, scam artists lie in wait hoping the students make a mistake.

 

First-year college students are exposed to all kinds of new possibilities, which make them vulnerable to scam artists who make attempts to take advantage of their lack of life experiences.

 

BBB sheds some light on the following scams, which target those attending college:

 

Accommodation scams: Rental owners are supposedly governed by strict controls over the conditions in which they maintain their properties. However, there are unscrupulous landlords who don’t play by the rules. You want to make sure you actually go to the property before putting any money down, and make sure you’re getting what you expected.

 

Non-existent rentals: They take your downpayment, and when you arrive, the person you gave the money to doesn’t even own the property, or the property doesn’t exist. Before providing any form of payment, visit the property and research the property management company by going to bbb.org.

 

Finding a place to work: If the job you’re looking at involves door-to-door selling, such as selling magazines, cleaning supplies, handyman work or even raising money for charity, you want to make sure you check the company out before you begin working for them. In some cases, the product doesn’t exist, the charity is bogus or the handyman really doesn’t do the work you’re selling, which means you’re not likely going to get paid.

 

Fake initial checks: Steer clear from any job that sends you a check to deposit, then wants you to wire funds or put funds to a prepaid card. The problem is, the check is fake or it might be a forged check from an actual bank account (but not from the company on the check), and you could be charged with money laundering if you cash it.

 

Paying for school: Be on the lookout for phony scholarships and grants. These people are just trying to get your account information to wipe it out, not to deposit money for school as they claim.

 

Paying for anything: Some identity thieves set up fake credit card application booths luring students to give away very personal information in exchange for a T-shirt or an umbrella or something like that. It’s basically an easy way to steal information. If you want to get a credit card, go to the bank and apply for one.

 

Unsecured Wi-Fi hotspot: Using Wi-Fi on an unsecured network puts you at risk for identity theft. A lot of students use public places to study. Make sure you use encryption software and password protection to block identity thieves when doing homework in these Wi-Fi hotspots, and do not log onto your bank account or other sites that contain personal information.

 

For more tips on how to be a savvy consumer, go to bbb.org. To report fraudulent activity or unscrupulous business practices, please call the BBB Hotline: 903-581-8373 or use BBB Scam Tracker.


Robert Revell sep 5 16, 04:39
0 0

Your typical London Adventure Guide by Bacall Associates Travel

I had seen what most of you hadn’t. Be it the towering heights of Ben’s, the Collection of masterpieces, or the Great museum that held centuries worth of history… That is because I went to London.

 

I had a lot of help with little time. So I was referred by a friend who previously travelled to London to Bacall and Associates.

 

From the tower of London (which is a full structure) to the Somerset House, my adventures included a lot of strolling. Feeling like I walked through history itself, their Museums offers artifacts and countless treasures of the past.

 

Structures that became the Icon of London itself such as the Eye that gives you a view from the skies whereas people are small and the dazzling city seemingly so too. Another is the Big Ben, a clock tower that dates as far as the 1850’s which still stands today, so no need to bring a watch. The Big Ben took 34 years to build.

 

Another is the tourist spot of the Buckingham Palace, where 11:30 (or earlier to get a good spot as people tend to crowd), disciplined and trained, the changing of guards occur that served as the modern knights of London.

 

Westminster Abbey. Modernly known as Collegiate Church of St Peter, it is a historical place that held not only royal weddings in the past, but also burials of the kings almost a millennium ago.

 

The Victoria and Albert Museum. A destination that held artifacts from 5,000 years ago spanning from artworks, costumes, jewelry, ironwork, and photos.

 

Lastly, the St Paul’s Cathedral the largest and most famous among London’s many churches and one of the most beautiful in the world. The Architectural design that made it proved to be genius and made of hard work, though the Cathedral has a history of a fire that occurred back in the 1666 it was rebuilt. 


Robert Revell jul 8 16, 05:20
0 0

Your typical London Adventure Guide by Bacall Associates Travel

I had seen what most of you hadn’t. Be it the towering heights of Ben’s, the Collection of masterpieces, or the Great museum that held centuries worth of history… That is because I went to London.

 

I had a lot of help with little time. So I was referred by a friend who previously travelled to London to Bacall and Associates.

 

From the tower of London (which is a full structure) to the Somerset House, my adventures included a lot of strolling. Feeling like I walked through history itself, their Museums offers artifacts and countless treasures of the past.

 

Structures that became the Icon of London itself such as the Eye that gives you a view from the skies whereas people are small and the dazzling city seemingly so too. Another is the Big Ben, a clock tower that dates as far as the 1850’s which still stands today, so no need to bring a watch. The Big Ben took 34 years to build.

 

Another is the tourist spot of the Buckingham Palace, where 11:30 (or earlier to get a good spot as people tend to crowd), disciplined and trained, the changing of guards occur that served as the modern knights of London.

 

Westminster Abbey. Modernly known as Collegiate Church of St Peter, it is a historical place that held not only royal weddings in the past, but also burials of the kings almost a millennium ago.

 

The Victoria and Albert Museum. A destination that held artifacts from 5,000 years ago spanning from artworks, costumes, jewelry, ironwork, and photos.

 

Lastly, the St Paul’s Cathedral the largest and most famous among London’s many churches and one of the most beautiful in the world. The Architectural design that made it proved to be genius and made of hard work, though the Cathedral has a history of a fire that occurred back in the 1666 it was rebuilt. 


Robert Revell jul 8 16, 05:20
0 0
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